Event: Webinar: Radicalisation & The Far Right

Date
12 Oct 2016, 11:00–00:00
Venue
Online Event
Rates

LGiU Members: £24.95 +VAT

Non-Members: £49.95 +VAT

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Join us in the final of three webinars where we look at “radicalisation” in the UK and the far right. Much attention has been given to “religious fundamentalism” that we sometimes forget that there is a growing example of hatred and provocation coming from the far right in the UK.

This webinar will consider the different types of threat presented by the various ‘faces’ of the far-right in contemporary Britain. This includes party political organisations like the BNP and NF – both shadows of their former selves – more recent ‘street-based’ movements like the English Defence Leagues and, more recently, PEGIDA; and finally, the risk of hate crimes and terrorism posed by right-wing extremism – both magnified in the wake of ‘Brexit’.

Alongside this overview of the British far-right, different kinds of ‘threat’ will also be considered, ranging from local considerations about community cohesion to forms of violent extremism dealt with, in particular, under the Prevent and Channel agendas.

This Webinar will be presented by Matthew Feldman who is a Professor in Contemporary History at Teesside University, a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Bergen, Norway, and he has held previous fellowships with the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham, as well as HEFCE and the University of Northampton, where he previously directed the School of Social Sciences’ Radicalism and New Media Research Group.

Event run in association with GlobalNet21

Event run in association with GlobalNet21


Who should attend?

This webinar will be of interest to elected members and officers involved in Prevent and tackling radicalisation.

Speakers

Speaker:

This Webinar will be presented by Matthew Feldman who is a Professor in Contemporary History at Teesside University, a Senior Research Fellow at the University of Bergen, Norway, and he has held previous fellowships with the Universities of Oxford and Birmingham, as well as HEFCE and the University of Northampton, where he previously directed the School of Social Sciences’ Radicalism and New Media Research Group.

Francis Sealey